"If you’re afraid to write it, it’s a good sign.’
I suppose you know you’re writing the truth when you’re terrified."
-

from Yrsa Daley-Ward, ‘bone.’

now available at amazon.com

(via yrsadaleyward)

davidstrider:

the fact that shia lebeoufs lack of relevance is what makes him relevant is ingenious and really characteristic of why i love the absurdist celebrity culture of 2014 its almost decadent in a way

every time i hear about the goings on of child stars i feel like thousands of black comedy pearls are spilling from the universe mothers fingertips

i love it bring on the second jazz age

lennykravitzscarf:

nuodai:

rcah:

there is nothing wrong with pretending your life is a wes anderson film 

monotonous and lacking of people of color ?

feferi-captor:

im-in-hiding:

the-fandoms-are-2spooky:

o-the-lost-girl:

dickstridork:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

patch-is-mine-bitch:

I can’t believe that this is stop-motion.

I CAN’T UNDERSTAND FUCKING STOP-MOTION THOSE FINGERS SHOULD FALL RIGHT OFF BUT NO THEY SUPPORT THEMSELVES BEAUTIFULLY
WHAT THE ACTUALLY FUCK STOP MOTION

The fingers are being supported by armature wire. Virtually all stop motion puppets have some variety of this going on underneath it:
Given  the proportions of Burton’s creations, the armatures underneath his puppets are probably custom-made.
What you’re also looking at is a ton of replacement animation on that teddy bear. Instead of actually tearing open the bear model, someone, or a few people, carefully crafted a handful of that specific bear at various stages of being cut open. If you look closely, the slab it’s on moves slightly, which gives itself away.
Also, Jack’s speaking is done through replacement animation. 

Stop motion utterly fascinates me.

GOD BLESS YOU

THIS IS THE THING I DONT GET ABOUT STOP MOTION
YOU HAVE TO PHYSICALLY MOVE THE DOLLS WITH UR HANDS AND REPLACE THEIR FACES //HOW DO YOU KEEP THEM IN THE SAME SPOT??????//


stop motion people are crazy
terriblylonely:

Today marks the one year anniversary of the most important tweet in American history